Adequate Yearly Progress FAQ

1. Q: What is adequate yearly progress or AYP?

A: AYP is part of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. It measures year-to-year student achievement. In order to meet the AYP standard, schools must:

• Have 87 percent of students at each grade level pass the reading and 83 percent of math sections of the state-mandated test.
• Test an average of 95 percent of all students each year.
• High schools have a 4-year graduation rate of 75 percent or 5-year graduation rate of 80 percent.
• Elementary and Intermediate schools must have an attendance rate of 95 percent.

2. Q: How did Klein schools perform?

A: Klein ISD had 29 schools that met AYP and 10 schools that did not meet AYP. Those not meeting AYP include Klein High School, Klein Forest High School, Klein Collins High School, Klein Intermediate, Krimmel Intermediate, Ulrich Intermediate, Northampton Elementary, Epps Island Elementary, Kaiser Elementary and Nitsch Elementary.

3. Q: How did the Klein ISD compare to schools and districts statewide?

A: The Klein ISD had 74 percent of evaluated schools that met AYP compared to 48 percent of public schools evaluated across the state. Statewide, only 27.9 percent of evaluated districts met AYP.

4. Q: Did any of these 10 schools that did not meet AYP show improvement from last year?

A: Yes, there was much improvement from last year. See the information below showing where the district and schools showed improvement or maintained in the accountability groups that counted toward this year’s accountability:

 

Reading/ELA

Mathematics

Klein ISD
7 groups that count

Improved in four and maintained in three accountability groups*

Improved in five and maintained in one accountability groups

Klein HS
5 groups that count

Improved in one and maintained in four accountability groups

Maintained in one accountability group

Klein Forest HS
6 groups that count

Improved in all accountability groups

Improved in five accountability groups

Klein Collins HS
5 groups that count

Improved in the one and maintained in two accountability groups

Maintained in one accountability group

Klein Intermediate
5 groups that count

Improved in three and maintained in two accountability groups

Improved in all accountability groups

Krimmel Intermediate
5 groups that count

Improved in all accountability groups

Improved in four accountability groups

Ulrich Intermediate
5 groups that count

Improved in four accountability groups

Improved in four accountability groups

Northampton Elementary
4 groups that count

 

 

Epps Island Elementary
4 groups that count

 

Improved in all four accountability groups

Kaiser Elementary
5 groups that count

Improved in two and maintained in two accountability groups

 

Nitsch Elementary
5 groups that count

Maintained in one accountability group

 


Accountability groups are explained in question 5.

5. Q: What is a student accountability group and why is there variance in the number counted on the campuses in the chart above?

A: The seven student accountability groups include All Students, African American, Hispanic, White, economically disadvantaged, special education and Limited English Proficient (LEP). Accountability groups are not considered for accountability if they do not have enough students tested from that particular group.

6. Q: What happens if schools do not meet AYP?

A: The district will work closely with those schools to help them meet AYP in following years. Schools that fail to meet AYP are required to revise their campus improvement plans to address the areas of weakness. Schools that fail to make AYP for two consecutive years for the same reason and receive Title I funds move into school improvement.

7. Q: Did any of the Klein schools fail to make AYP for two consecutive years?

A: Yes, Klein Intermediate did not make AYP for two consecutive years.

8. Q: What is school improvement?

A: Once a campus is in school improvement, they must revise their campus improvement plan to specifically address the missed area(s). Parents are notified in writing giving them the option for school choice, allowing them to request a transfer to another Klein school.

9. Q: Are there any financial consequences for not making AYP a Title I campus/district?

A: Yes, Title I funds must be set aside for school improvement activities at the campus and district levels.

10. Q: Did the district meet AYP?

A: No. Klein ISD missed AYP in reading/English Language Arts (ELA) for the special education and LEP accountability groups. The district also fell short of meeting AYP in math, as results showed Klein ISD narrowly missed the standard in the African American accountability group by three percent (standard 83 percent), and again in the special education accountability group. In evaluating the graduation rate standard, Klein ISD missed AYP in the special education accountability group (71.7 percent in this accountability group graduated in four years, 79.2 percent in five years).

11. Q: I keep hearing about a federal cap being placed on special education students. What does that mean?

A: The federal cap limits the number of special education that can be counted as passers regardless of whether they actually pass the modified or alternative version of the test.

12. Q: Why not just limit the number of special education that take a modified or alternative version of the test?

A: The campus Admission, Review and Dismissal (ARD) committee determines annually which tests students should take to be appropriately assessed based upon a set of guidelines. It would not be in the best interest of the students to inappropriately test them in an attempt to meet a federal guideline.

13. Q: What happens if a district misses AYP?

A: Districts failing to meet AYP for two consecutive years for the same reason move into the school improvement program and are required to develop an improvement plan that addresses that area. For the Klein ISD, that means that we will begin making adjustments to the district and campus improvement plans to address areas of need based on the data we received from the State.

14. Q: I heard the standards to meet AYP for this year are different from last year. What changed?

A: The AYP system of rating districts/campuses increased passing expectations eight percentage points in Mathematics and seven percentage points in Reading/English Language Arts. In addition, graduation rates were evaluated for not only all students but also each student accountability group meeting minimum size criteria.

15. Q: Will the standards change again next year?

A: Yes, the standards increase again in 2013 to 93 percent in reading/ELA and 92 percent in math and in 2014, the standards increase to 100 percent required passing for all students and all accountability groups.

16. Q: I heard that the majority of the states requested a waiver and are exempt from meeting AYP. Is that true and why isn’t Texas exempt?

A: Yes, at the time of this writing 33 states have received a waiver. Texas did not apply for the waiver because one of the requirements to meet the waiver meant having to move to the common core standards required by the federal government. Texas opted to continue with Texas standards which the state believes to be higher and more rigorous than the common core.

17. Q: Are Texas public schools and the Klein ISD preparing our students for college and the workplace?

A: YES!!!!! Texas public schools and the Klein ISD are doing an excellent job preparing our students for life beyond public school.

  • Since 2003, passing rates on every single Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills test at every grade have improved dramatically.
  • Statewide, exit level math passing rates more than doubled since 2003, rising from 44 percent in 2003 to 90 percent in 2011, even as standards rose steadily over the same period.
  • Students also knocked it out of the park statewide on the exit-level science exam where rates rose from 47 percent to 91 percent between 2003 and 2011.
  • Klein ISD students showed gains in math from 2006 to 2011 as our scores grew from 88 percent to 90 percent and science jumped from 86 percent to 94 percent.
  • In 2011, the state passing rates on 23 of the 27 subject area tests were in the 80 to 99 percent range.
  • Graduates rates in Texas are among the highest in America, in fact, Texas is in the top 5 across the nation in three key demographic  groups and Klein ISD meets or exceeds the state
    • Texas – 91 percent of White students graduate in four years
    • Klein ISD – 91 percent of White students graduate in four years
    • Texas – 78 percent of Hispanic students graduate in four years – 4th ranking in the nation
    • Klein ISD – 93 percent  of Hispanic students graduate in four years
    • Texas – 78 percent of African American students graduate in four year – 5th ranking in the nation
    • Klein ISD – 82 percent of African American students graduate in four year
  •  Texas’ 8th graders earn second highest score in nation on NAEP science exam
  • Also on the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) exam, Hispanic 8th graders in Texas rank 7th, African-American 8th, and white graders rank 2nd in the nation.
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